News:

NOTICE! The Contact button is for: (1) unregistered people having registration issues ONLY, OR (2) Registered Members who have encountered a problem in an area of the board. Questions about writing, publishing, or how to post that come through the Contact button will not be addressed.

Main Menu
SCBWI welcomes you to their "new" Discussion Boards. Everyone interested in children's literature is encouraged to join and participate in ongoing discussions. Play nice, have fun, and enjoy sharing with your peers from around the world.

NEED HELP POSTING? Go here! https://www.scbwidiscussionboards.org/index.php?topic=80554.msg1011631#msg1011631

Before you hit "submit": Assessing small publishers

Started by Marissa Doyle, February 07, 2016, 12:04 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

christripp

>Honestly, I wonder if the PB market is just extra hard.  A lot of people writing, not that many agents<

I really believe it IS the hardest of the markets!
All kinds of things working against a Pic Book Author...
Agents only get their percentage from 5%, instead of the usual Authors 10%, so less open to reping a PB Author only (not an Illustrator as well), especially one that is brand new.
Pic books cost Publishers a lot to make. The Author's advance is usually a little smaller then the advance they have to put out for the Illustrator, then there is the paper stock that's more expensive then for other books. So they are going to likely be more selective about which and how many they take on.

I think MOST Authors AND Illustrators work in a number of genre's and area's. Magazine (Adult and kids) Greeting cards, Advertising. Take that break working on something completely different for a while and then enjoy your Fall Conference. THAT will not doubt rejuvenate and inspire:)
"Penelope and the Humongous Burp"
"Penelope and the Monsters"
"Penelope and the Preposterous Birthday Party"

luzgelida

Great article Marissa! Obviously you are very well seasoned writer!  :goodpost

AnneB

Bumping. This thread also has helpful info for assessing a POD or other pay-to-publish organizations.

HaroldU

Good idea to bump this!

I have two things to add. I wrote an article about "no-advance" publishers since this thread was last active. Here it is: http://www.underdown.org/no-advance.htm

Also, if you've come across a company called Austin Macaulay, FYI, they are a vanity press operation presenting themselves as a "traditional publisher."
Harold Underdown

The Purple Crayon, a children's book editor's site: https://www.underdown.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/HUnderdown/

carrots

Thank you for linking to your article, Harold. It's an **excellent** resource (and something I wish I read before).


HaroldU

You're welcome! I wrote it originally as a response to a discussion in a Facebook group about one of those no-advance publishers (who I will leave unnamed here).

The points about researching what they do AS a publisher versus what they leave up to authors are relevant to other kinds of publishers...
Harold Underdown

The Purple Crayon, a children's book editor's site: https://www.underdown.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/HUnderdown/

kwlarson

Hannah Holt recently posted the results of her self-publishing survey, and her results provide some interesting context for evaluating no-advance publishers.

Here's a summary she provided in Kidlit411.

"Authors signing with no-advance traditional houses sell and earn about the same as self-published authors. (Authors at advance paying houses sell significantly more copies on average.) If you are considering signing with a no-advance house, weigh your publishing goals carefully. With self-publishing you'd have significantly more control over your project. Ask the no-advance house questions to find out how much editing and marketing support you can expect. In any case, it's very unlikely you're tapping into a large or even moderate distribution network with a no-advance house. That said, self-publishing carries more risk for authors. Up to 30% of children's authors self-publishing lost money (many authors in the survey weren't sure whether or not they had made money). This is all just information to consider as you decide the best publishing fit for your work."

Find full results at:

https://hannahholt.com/blog/2018/5/17/self-publishing-childrens-books-a-look-at-the-numbers
Kirsten W. Larson
--
WOOD, WIRE, WINGS (Calkins Creek, 2020)
A TRUE WONDER (Clarion, 2021)
THE FIRE OF STARS (Chronicle, 2022)

mrh


Ev

Both Harold's article and Hannah's survey/summary provide excellent information.  With so many options available to authors these days, it's good to be aware of the pros and cons of each of them.

My own experiences have been different from most, and I think, in an article on the topic, it might be worth mentioning that educational publishers frequently fall into a separate category from other no-advance publishers. They may have their own sales force and catalog distribution for one thing. I've had more than 40 books published with  seven different educational publishers that gave me royalty/no-advance contracts. Some of those experiences turned out to be disappointments, but the majority were happy experiences.

So, if I hear someone say, "Never consider a no-advance contract," I would suggest that the decision is not always clear cut. It's a good idea to consider the things that Harold lists in his article.

HaroldU

Quote from: Ev on June 06, 2018, 11:53 AM
My own experiences have been different from most, and I think, in an article on the topic, it might be worth mentioning that educational publishers frequently fall into a separate category from other no-advance publishers. They may have their own sales force and catalog distribution for one thing. I've had more than 40 books published with  seven different educational publishers that gave me royalty/no-advance contracts. Some of those experiences turned out to be disappointments, but the majority were happy experiences.

So, if I hear someone say, "Never consider a no-advance contract," I would suggest that the decision is not always clear cut. It's a good idea to consider the things that Harold lists in his article.

That's true, Ev! My article focuses on trade publishers. As you say, publishers in the school market may pay no advance (or a low advance), but be worth working with because they do all the things we want publishers to do. That's why I tell people to find out what a particular publisher will actually DO.
Harold Underdown

The Purple Crayon, a children's book editor's site: https://www.underdown.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/HUnderdown/

Having trouble registering? Does something on the board not work correctly? If so, use the Contact button at the top of the page and we will get back to you. Note: questions about writing, publishing, or "how to post" are NOT answered through the Contact button. If you are registered, scroll the Home page to find categories where you can post. Only registered members can post.